Next 25 Results →
September 2018 — December 2018

The Data Scientist Shortage is Huge. Here’s How to Beat It. (Dec 30, 2018)
It’s no secret that employers are looking for data scientists. Businesses of all sizes have woken up to the fact that data science has the potential to drive efficiencies, mine new insights from decades of accumulated data sets, and otherwise transform their businesses. From Zillow’s home price predictions to Amazon’s recommendation engines, applications of data science have become increasingly prevalent and high-profile.



The Vital Engines of Commerce (Dec 30, 2018)
It took a very, very long time, but if current conditions persist, we could see a server market that rakes in more than $100 billion next year. That is a crazy amount of infrastructure, and is a reflection not only of the rising cost of machines, which are being jam-packed with expensive processors, memory, flash, and sometimes GPU or FPGA accelerators, but in the tremendous amount of computing that modern applications take and, presumably, the even larger value that organizations are deriving f...
Read More



Computer Hardware Originally Designed for 3D Games Could Hold the Key to Replicating the Human Brain (Dec 29, 2018)
Researchers at the University of Sussex have created the fastest and most energy efficient simulation of part of a rat brain using off-the-shelf computer hardware. Dr James Knight and Prof Thomas Nowotny from the University of Sussex’s School of Engineering and Informatics have beaten a top 50 supercomputer by running brain simulations using their own GeNN software and Graphics Processing Units (GPUs).



World’s Fastest Supercomputer Now Running Production Workloads at ORNL (Dec 29, 2018)
The world’s fastest supercomputer is now up and running production workloads at ORNL. "A year-long acceptance process for the 200-petaflop Summit supercomputer at Oak Ridge National Lab is now complete. Acceptance testing ensures that the supercomputer and its file system meet the functionality, performance, and stability requirements agreed upon by the facility and the vendor." To successfully complete acceptance, the Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility (OLCF) worked closely with system v...
Read More



PSC Supplies Computation to Large Hadron Collider Group (Nov 10, 2018)
The Pittsburgh Supercomputing Center (PSC) is now supplying computation for the world’s most powerful particle collider. Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) scientists working on the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment, in collaboration with the Open Science Grid, have begun analyzing data from the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) using PSC’s Bridges supercomputer.



Use of Natural Language Processing and AI Driving Big Data Innovation to New Levels (Nov 9, 2018)
We’ve all heard the expression that ‘data is the new gold,’ and there’s no doubt that customer data in particular can fundamentally transform a business. However, data is rarely stored, located or created in one place—and it’s really hard to know what data does exist to have a holistic and accurate view of a business. Any business executive with accountability to the bottom line will tell you, the success of a strategic initiative is dependent on accurate and timely information.



Bringing Researchers to the Frontier of FPGA Development (Nov 9, 2018)
There are two key barriers to fully exploring the emerging use of Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs) at the scale found in data centers: capital investment for private equipment, and gaining full, unfettered access to shared equipment. Derek Chiou, and his colleagues at the Texas Advanced Computing Center (TACC), are on a mission to change all that. They hope to spur ground breaking research for applying FPGAs.



‘Human Brain’ Supercomputer with 1 Million Processors Switched on for First Time (Nov 8, 2018)
The world’s largest neuromorphic supercomputer designed and built to work in the same way a human brain does has been fitted with its landmark one-millionth processor core and is being switched on for the first time. The newly formed million-processor-core ‘Spiking Neural Network Architecture’ or ‘SpiNNaker’ machine is capable of completing more than 200 million million actions per second, with each of its chips having 100 million moving parts.



DOE to Showcase World-Class Computational Science at SC18 (Nov 8, 2018)
Researchers and staff from 15 National Labs will showcase DOE’s latest computing and networking innovations and accomplishments at SC18 in Dallas next week. Computational scientists working for DOE laboratories have been involved in the conference since organizing the first meeting in 1988 and this year’s event is no different.



Is Computer Science Really All About Math? (Nov 7, 2018)
Is computer science all about mathematics? Your question is subtle; so any short answer is probably wrong. Programmers who excelled in math, assert that you must know math to be a good programmer; programmers who were not strong math students, assert equally strongly that you don’t need to know math.



From Fighting Alzheimer’s to AR Captions (Nov 7, 2018)
As the University of Washington’s computer science program has grown, so too has the breadth of problems that its students are trying to solve. That variety was on full display Thursday evening on campus, as projects focused on healthcare, cloud computing, augmented and virtual reality and much more were honored. A project called Embarker, which focuses on identifying genes that can be used as markers that could predict Alzheimer’s Disease, took home the 13th annual Madrona Prize for the pro...
Read More



Researchers Use Video Games to Unlock New Levels of AI (Nov 6, 2018)
Expectations for artificial intelligences are very real and very high. An analysis in Forbes projects revenues from A.I. will skyrocket from $1.62 billion in 2018 to $31.2 billion in 2025. The report also included a survey revealing 84 percent of enterprises believe investing in A.I. will lead to competitive advantages.



Web Pioneer Wants New 'Contract' for Internet (Nov 6, 2018)
The inventor of the worldwide web, Tim Berners-Lee, on Monday announced plans for a "contract" to ensure the internet remains "safe and accessible" for all. "All kinds of things have things have gone wrong," the computer scientist, who in 1989 invented the Web as a platform, said at the opening of the Web Summit, Europe's largest tech event. "We have fake news, we have problems with privacy, we have people being profiled and manipulated," he said. Like other tech pioneers, Berners-Lee saw the in...
Read More



First Proof of Quantum Computer Advantage (Nov 5, 2018)
For many years, quantum computers were not much more than an idea. Today, companies, governments and intelligence agencies are investing in the development of quantum technology. Robert König, professor for the theory of complex quantum systems at the TUM, in collaboration with David Gosset from the Institute for Quantum Computing at the University of Waterloo and Sergey Bravyi from IBM, has now placed a cornerstone in this promising field.



Machines that Learn Language More Like Kids Do (Nov 5, 2018)
Children learn language by observing their environment, listening to the people around them, and connecting the dots between what they see and hear. Among other things, this helps children establish their language’s word order, such as where subjects and verbs fall in a sentence. In computing, learning language is the task of syntactic and semantic parsers. These systems are trained on sentences annotated by humans that describe the structure and meaning behind words.



XSEDE HPC Training Series (Sep 15, 2018)
XSEDE runs an HPC Monthly Workshop Series on Big Data, MPI, OpenMP, OpenACC, and GPUs. These are offered as live multicast workshops to ~25 sites per month. If you are not at a site that offers these workshops or want a refresher, we are happy to say that recordings are being made available on YouTube. There are now three topics available, Big Data, OpenACC, and OpenMP; each as several videos grouped into a playlist available on YouTube.



ORNL-Developed Technology Streamlines Computational Science Projects (Sep 15, 2018)
Since designing and launching a specialized workflow management system in 2010, a research team from the US Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory has continuously updated the technology to help computational scientists develop software, visualize data and solve problems.



Tiny Camera Lens May Help Link Quantum Computers to Network (Sep 14, 2018)
An international team of researchers led by The Australian National University (ANU) has invented a tiny camera lens, which may lead to a device that links quantum computers to an optical fibre network. Quantum computers promise a new era in ultra-secure networks, artificial intelligence and therapeutic drugs, and will be able to solve certain problems much faster than today's computers.



Defense Against Adversarial Attacks Using Machine Learning and Cryptography (Sep 14, 2018)
Researchers at the University of Geneva have recently developed a new defense mechanism that works by bridging machine learning with cryptography. The new system, outlined in a paper pre-published on arXiv, is based on Kerckhoffs' second cryptographic principle, which states that both defense and classification algorithms are known, but the key is not.



XSEDE HPC Training Series (Sep 13, 2018)
XSEDE runs an HPC Monthly Workshop Series on Big Data, MPI, OpenMP, OpenACC, and GPUs. These are offered as live multicast workshops to ~25 sites per month. If you are not at a site that offers these workshops or want a refresher, we are happy to say that recordings are being made available on YouTube. There are now three topics available, Big Data, OpenACC, and OpenMP; each as several videos grouped into a playlist available on YouTube.



4 Steps to Jump-start Modern Learning Environments at Universities (Sep 12, 2018)
Active learning classrooms have transformed how K–12 schools are delivering their curricula, and universities are starting to take notice. This transformative model creates a collaborative environment through student-centered learning and supported technology. Replacing traditional lectures, active learning gives students a constructive role in the learning process. Research shows that ALC methods provide substantial learning advantages. These benefits include increased self-reliance, more mea...
Read More



Melinda Gates Rallies Top Tech Companies to Double Women of Color Studying Computer Science by 2025 (Sep 12, 2018)
Melinda Gates is convening leading tech companies in an effort to dramatically increase the number of computer science degrees awarded to women of color, part of a broader effort to improve diversity in an industry dominated by white men. Gates’ independent executive office, Pivotal Ventures, and McKinsey & Company released a report Wednesday that shows more work is needed to bring underrepresented groups into technology. That’s the goal of the new Reboot Representation Tech Coalition, a coo...
Read More



XSEDE HPC Training Series (Sep 11, 2018)
XSEDE runs an HPC Monthly Workshop Series on Big Data, MPI, OpenMP, OpenACC, and GPUs. These are offered as live multicast workshops to ~25 sites per month. If you are not at a site that offers these workshops or want a refresher, we are happy to say that recordings are being made available on YouTube. There are now three topics available, Big Data, OpenACC, and OpenMP; each as several videos grouped into a playlist available on YouTube.



Europe's Advantage in the Race to Exascale (Sep 11, 2018)
As France, Japan, China, and the United States vie to build the world’s first exascale computer, application and technology developers and researchers in each country are up against major hurdles. In France, CEA (the French Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission) is racing against a 2021 deadline to modernize its code for its future next-generation computer. As part of its efforts, CEA has been collaborating closely with the University Versailles Saint-Quentin (UVSQ) and Intel as pa...
Read More



Computational Biophysics in the Petascale Computing Era (Sep 10, 2018)
Advances in structural, chemical, and biophysical data acquisition (e.g., protein structures via X-ray crystallography and near atomic cryoEM, isothermal calorimetry, etc.), coupled with the continued exponential growth in computing power and advances in the underlying algorithms are opening a new era for the simulation of biological systems at the molecular level, and at scales never before reached. In this talk I will discuss how the BlueWaters Petascale computing architecture forever altered ...
Read More

©1994-2019   |   Shodor   |   Privacy Policy   |   NSDL   |   XSEDE   |   Blue Waters   |   ACM SIGHPC   |   feedback  |   facebook   |   twitter   |   rss   |   youtube Not Logged In. Login