Next 25 Results →
January 2020 — February 2020

Flyception 2.0: New Imaging Technology Tracks Complex Social Behavior (Feb 5, 2020)
Scientists at the University of California San Diego have a much clearer idea thanks to the evolution of an advanced imaging system designed to record ultra-precise brain activities in flies. Called "Flyception" when it was announced in 2016 as a system that could record freely walking flies, the new "Flyception2" employs a more advanced tracking and recording system that allows flies to move about uninhibited, allowing researchers to study brain activities during intricate behaviors.



The Most Human Algorithm (Feb 5, 2020)
It is now possible to predict who the best candidate for receiving an organ transplant is, know whether clients of a bank will return the loans they request, choose the films that best coincide with the interests of consumers, or even select someone's ideal partner.



Living Robots Built Using Frog Cells (Feb 4, 2020)
A book is made of wood. But it is not a tree. The dead cells have been repurposed to serve another need. Now a team of scientists has repurposed living cells -- scraped from frog embryos -- and assembled them into entirely new life-forms. These millimeter-wide "xenobots" can move toward a target, perhaps pick up a payload (like a medicine that needs to be carried to a specific place inside a patient) -- and heal themselves after being cut.



Researchers Report Progress on Molecular Data Storage System (Feb 4, 2020)
A team of Brown University researchers has made substantial progress in an effort to create a new type of molecular data storage system. In a study published in Nature Communications, the team stored a variety of image files -- a Picasso drawing, an image of the Egyptian god Anubis and others -- in arrays of mixtures containing custom-synthesized small molecules.



The Unanticipated Consequences of Containerization (Feb 3, 2020)
Imagine that you’re building a development with 500 houses. You don’t want to end up with a bungalow, a colonial and a loft all spackled together. Yet this is the inevitable result if none of the builders are talking to each other and there’s no easily accessible master plan.



Most of HPC Happens Under the Radar (Feb 3, 2020)
While supercomputers are arguably the most exciting segment of the high performance computing market, the majority of systems deployed in any given year do not fit into this elite category.



Supercomputer Simulations Reveal Details of Galaxy Clusters (Feb 2, 2020)
Inspired by the science fiction of the spacefaring Romulans of Star Trek, astrophysicists have developed cosmological computer simulations called RomulusC, where the ‘C’ stands for galaxy cluster. With a focus on black hole physics, RomulusC has produced some of the highest resolution simulations ever of galaxy clusters, which can contain hundreds or even thousands of galaxies.



Building a Federated Research Collaborative (Feb 2, 2020)
The concept of countrywide and worldwide research collaboratives is relatively new. Several decades ago it was common for a department head to have multiple vertical file cabinets with paper folders housing the work of researchers and students in his or her department.



Meet the Man Behind Japan’s Bid to Build World’s Greenest Supercomputer (Jan 21, 2020)
Satoshi Matsuoka got his start in computers in the 1980s, when he co-developed a popular pinball game for the Super Nintendo games console. Now, some 40 years later, he’s leading Japan’s Fugaku project, which aims to build one of the fastest and greenest supercomputers in the world.



MIT Develops Machine-Learning Tool to Make Code Run Faster (Jan 20, 2020)
MIT researchers have invented a machine-learning tool that predicts how fast computer chips will execute code from various applications. To get code to run as fast as possible, developers and compilers — programs that translate programming language into machine-readable code — typically use performance models that run the code through a simulation of given chip architectures.



PEARC20 - Call for Participation (Jan 20, 2020)
You are invited to submit papers, workshops, tutorials and more for the PEARC20 Conference that will be held in Portland, July 26–30, 2020. Presentations may address any topic related to advanced research computing, but topics consistent with one or more of the following four technical tracks are of particular interest: advanced research computing systems, application software and support, professional development and machine learning and artificial intelligence.



Aurora Early Science Program Facilitates Effort to Create More Efficient Solar Cells (Jan 19, 2020)
Looking for new materials that make photovoltaic solar cells more efficient is a challenge that has taxed current supercomputing resources to the max. That’s why a number of academic institutions are collaborating with Carnegie Mellon University to tackle the task.



The Development of Science: A Focus on Computer Simulation (Jan 19, 2020)
Molecular modelling and computer simulations have played a fundamental role in the development of science since the second half of the last century. They have opened a new venue in our understanding of natural phenomena and in our ability to address basic scientific challenges.



Wave Physics as an Analog Recurrent Neural Network (Jan 18, 2020)
Analog machine learning hardware offers a promising alternative to digital counterparts as a more energy efficient and faster platform. Wave physics based on acoustics and optics is a natural candidate to build analog processors for time-varying signals.



PEARC20 - Call for Participation (Jan 18, 2020)
You are invited to submit papers, workshops, tutorials and more for the PEARC20 Conference that will be held in Portland, July 26–30, 2020. Presentations may address any topic related to advanced research computing, but topics consistent with one or more of the following four technical tracks are of particular interest: advanced research computing systems, application software and support, professional development and machine learning and artificial intelligence.



Researchers Build a Particle Accelerator That Fits on a Chip (Jan 17, 2020)
On a hillside above Stanford University, the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory operates a scientific instrument nearly 2 miles long. In this giant accelerator, a stream of electrons flows through a vacuum pipe, as bursts of microwave radiation nudge the particles ever-faster forward until their velocity approaches the speed of light, creating a powerful beam that scientists from around the world use to probe the atomic and molecular structures of inorganic and biological materials.



VR is Not Suited to Visual Memory?! (Jan 17, 2020)
Kyoko Hine, Assistant Professor at the Department of Computer Science and Engineering, Toyohashi University of Technology and a research team at Tokyo Denki University have found that virtual reality (VR) may interfere with visual memory. In recent years, there has been high expectation that VR will be used effectively not only in multimedia and entertainment, but also in educational settings.



AI for #MeToo: Training Algorithms to Spot Online Trolls (Jan 16, 2020)
Researchers at Caltech have demonstrated that machine-learning algorithms can monitor online social media conversations as they evolve, which could one day lead to an effective and automated way to spot online trolling.



PEARC20 - Call for Participation (Jan 16, 2020)
You are invited to submit papers, workshops, tutorials and more for the PEARC20 Conference that will be held in Portland, July 26–30, 2020. Presentations may address any topic related to advanced research computing, but topics consistent with one or more of the following four technical tracks are of particular interest: advanced research computing systems, application software and support, professional development and machine learning and artificial intelligence.



We’re Teaching Coding All Wrong (Jan 15, 2020)
Any tech breakthrough is almost always a joint effort. To add a single feature to an iPhone app, teams of front-end engineers, user experience designers and graphic designers must work with cyber security specialists, back-end developers and iOS developers — just for starters. That means that today’s best engineers are prodigious collaborators and communicators. And yet we still train too many prospective coders to work alone.



‘Techlash’ Hits College Campuses (Jan 15, 2020)
In 2006, Google bought YouTube for more than $1 billion, Apple was preparing to announce the first iPhone, and the American housing bubble began to deflate. Claire Stapleton, then a senior at the University of Pennsylvania, faced the same question over and over: What did she plan to do with that English degree? She flirted, noncommittally, with Teach for America.



The 15 Key Technology Hurdles, Trends and Enablers for 2020 (Jan 14, 2020)
An organization of school technology leaders has given a peek at the "hurdles, accelerators and tech enablers" that innovation efforts in K-12 will face in the coming year. The Consortium for School Networking (CoSN) developed the list based on an annual innovation survey among its members and discussion among an advisory board that includes nearly 100 education leaders and practitioners.



PEARC20 - Call for Participation (Jan 14, 2020)
You are invited to submit papers, workshops, tutorials and more for the PEARC20 Conference that will be held in Portland, July 26–30, 2020. Presentations may address any topic related to advanced research computing, but topics consistent with one or more of the following four technical tracks are of particular interest: advanced research computing systems, application software and support, professional development and machine learning and artificial intelligence.



The Supercomputing Efficiency Curve Bends in the Right Direction (Jan 13, 2020)
Things get a little wonky at exascale and hyperscale. Things that don’t matter quite as much at enterprise scale, such as the cost or the performance per watt or the performance per dollar per watt for a system or a cluster, end up dominating the buying decisions.



China Ramps Up Tech Education in Bid to Become Artificial Intelligence Leader (Jan 13, 2020)
A bespectacled eight-year-old has become the poster child for China’s campaign to dominate the world of high tech. From his home in Shanghai, Vita Zhou hosts training videos for other children on how to code for artificial intelligence.

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